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BARE NEWS: What You Really Need to Know

NEWS FOR RADIOLOGY:

WHAT YOU REALLY NEED TO KNOW!

 

Greg Laukhuf ND, RN, CRN, RN-BC, NE-BC

 

Is red meat ruining your heart? Here's what one study is saying.

Hudson, H., CorreaI, R. (June 4, 2019). Is red meat ruining your heart? Here's what one study is saying. Ivanhoe Newswire. Retrieved https://www.click2houston.com/health/is-red-meat-ruining-your-heart-here-s-what-one-study-is-saying

In a Cleveland Clinic study, you may be at risk for heart disease if steaks and burgers are a regular part of your diet.  Stanley Hazen, MD, Ph.D., cardiovascular medicine, Cleveland Clinic said, “How does this impact the development of a compound called TMAO, which stands for trimethylamine n-oxide, it’s made by gut microbes and known to contribute to the development of heart disease and what we found is that individuals who eat a diet that’s rich in red meat, have a significant elevation in their TMAO level.” TMAO increases cholesterol in the artery wall increasing risk of heart attack and stroke. TMAO levels return to normal in three weeks after stopping dietary intake of red meat.

 

A one-of-a-kind Cleveland high school is tucked inside Metro Health

Schultz, J. (June 21, 2019). A one-of-a-kind Cleveland high school is tucked inside Metro Health.  News5 Cleveland.com. Retrieved https://www.news5cleveland.com/news/local-news/cleveland-metro/a-one-of-a-kind-cleveland-high-school-is-tucked-inside-metrohealth

Sirens, alarms, are the normal sounds of Metro Health Hospital. Tucked inside is the sound of students, teachers and learning. The Lincoln-West School of Science and Health opened in 2016.  Alan Nevel the Chief Diversity and HR officer of Metro Health shared, “By having that school in this very facility, the students have an opportunity to interact with professionals who are in careers that they aspire to.” … Metro Health officials say it’s the only high school in the nation to be located inside a hospital.

 

Healthcare settings face challenges in identification, treatment, and prevention

Walker, M. (July 29, 2019). MedPage Today. Healthcare settings face challenges in identification, treatment, and prevention. Retrieved https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/infectioncontrol/81290

Identifying, treating, and preventing Candida auris is a challenge facing more and more healthcare settings. With 90% of C. auris resistant to fluconazole, and 40% resistant to at least two classes of antifungal agents, limited options exist for patients with C. auris, reported Snigdha Vallabhaneni, MD, MPH and his team at the CDC.

"From an infection control perspective, C. auris acts more like a multidrug-resistant, health care-associated bacteria than like a typical yeast. It is a new bug using old tricks mastered by some well-known, multidrug resistant organisms,".

But identification can be difficult. Vallabhaneni and colleagues wrote that C. auris can often be misidentified. Antibiotic stewardship, improved maintenance practice for central venous catheters and targeted antifungal prophylaxis can all help in C. auris prevention efforts.

The authors share rapid diagnostic tests and effective decolonization methods are "urgently needed," and also recommended "bolstering laboratory detection capacity, strengthening public health surveillance and improving infection control practices."

Reference:

Vallabhaneni S, et al "Candida auris: An Emerging Antimicrobial Resistance Threat" Ann Intern Med 2019; DOI: 10.7326/M19-2205.

 

Stressing about brain health

Baldridge, S. (August 13, 2019). Stressing about brain health. Ashland Times Gazette.com. Retrieved https://www.times-gazette.com/article/20190803/NEWS/308029930/1994.

Stress makes us too fat or too thin, sad, anxious, depressed or angry.  Stress has been linked to autoimmune disease, increased blood pressure, decreased libido and memory issues. However, the right kind and amount of stress, has been shown to help improve symptoms mentioned above. Our brains are designed to run as efficiently as possible. They thrive on routine because when our brain finds predictable patterns and run on autopilot, which saves energy. … Stressor No. 1 that is good for your brain is to give your brain something new to do. Learn something purely cerebral. Learn something tactile. Learn something that you don’t know. Do something routine in an unusual way. … Stressor 2 is something you already know is good for you – physical activity. This stressor improves blood flow to the brain. It also releases the chemicals responsible for repairing the connections between neurons in the brain. Better connections in the brain helps the brain function better.

 

New Alzheimer's Blood Test 94% Accurate

Brooks, M. (August 2, 2019). New Alzheimer's Blood Test 94% Accurate. Medscape.com. Retrieved https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/916372?nlid=130965_5402&src=wnl_dne_190805_mscpedit&uac=248140AN&impID=2050258&faf=1

A new blood test to detect early Alzheimer's disease (AD) has moved one step closer to reality reported in a recent online Neurology article. Researchers found that measuring the ratio of β-amyloid (Aβ) 42 and Aβ40 in blood using a high-precision assay is 94% accurate in diagnosing brain amyloidosis. "Right now, we screen people for clinical trials with brain scans, which is time-consuming and expensive, and enrolling participants takes years," senior investigator Randall J. Bateman, MD, "But with a blood test, we could screen thousands of people a month. That means we can more efficiently enroll participants in clinical trials, which will help us find treatments faster, ……," he added.

 

 ‘MENtion it’: Cleveland Clinic survey reveals why guys avoid the doctor

(September 4, 2019). ‘MENtion it’: Cleveland Clinic survey reveals why guys avoid the doctor. Fox8.com. Retrieved News5 Cleveland.com - Cleveland Clinic: Men would rather do chores than go to doctor - https://www.news5cleveland.com/news/health/cleveland-clinic-men-would-rather-do-chores-than-go-to-doctor

A Cleveland Clinic survey reveals that men will do almost anything to avoid seeing a doctor. The online survey sampled 1,174 men in the US, 18 years old and older, as part of the annual educational campaign, “MENtion it.” According to participants, they would do the following to avoid seeing their physician. *72% would rather do household chores. *77% of married men would rather go shopping. *65% of men prefer to try to self-diagnose before going to the doctor.  20% of those surveyed admitted they have not been completely honest with doctor because of the following: * 46% said they were embarrassed; *36% said they didn’t want to hear  needed changes to change their diet/lifestyle; *37%  they weren’t ready to face the diagnosis and would rather not know.

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